How can a partner, spouse or friend support a phobia sufferer?

Discussion in 'Your achievements - we want to hear them!' started by Mark, Jun 7, 2016.

  1. Mark

    Mark Active Member

    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    28
    Having suffered from phobias and anxiety in the past I know what helped me and have my own thoughts on this subject but I would be interested to hear the thoughts of others @KirstyMarks @Andy @Craig
     
  2. Andy

    Andy Member

    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    18
    Without doubt, THE most important thing is that they understand and accept that you have an issue.
     
    Mark and Craig like this.
  3. Mark

    Mark Active Member

    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    28
    Some people try tough love - I presume that is the worst thing you can do?
     
  4. Andy

    Andy Member

    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    18
    What you need to remember is that every case is individual, there's no "one size fits all" approach that works for everyone.

    Some people may respond to tough love better than the softly softly.
     
    Mark and Craig like this.
  5. Craig

    Craig Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    15
    Andy is right.

    Telling people it is all in their head and suck it up can feel demeaning for the person with it. Some will think it is ridiculous to have such a phobia or be anxious about something. Because they do not understand it as they have never suffered with it.

    Family support is great, encouragement is brilliant to help someone feel safe, yet again. Over time. Will it help someone to overcome the issue.? Often not as it can become a crutch. I am all for support of loved ones or friends as long as it is positive and not something whereby the person is hidden away and pitied or indeed forced into facing certain things which makes them even more uncomfortable.

    We get many people come to us for these issues and often they have said that it drives their family, wife, husband etc up the wall as they do not understand it.

    They can be of benefit yet it can be double edged sword depending on how it is approached.

    Craig.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2016
    Mark and Andy like this.
  6. Mark

    Mark Active Member

    Messages:
    225
    Likes Received:
    28
    I don't know how she did it but my wife immediately found a balance between being supportive and understanding and also pushing me at times - without her help I would have struggled to get through it. I can only imagine it must be a very very lonely place if your family and friends are not supportive of you in your time of need. I am not saying their support is the game changer in the battle but having their support is perhaps once less thing to worry about?
     
    Andy and Craig like this.

Share This Page